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20130117
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
foreign policy challenges. >> usama bin laden in documents that came out of abadabad quoted as urging his cohorts to go to other places. to get away from the airplanes. get away from the drones. he specifically encouraged al-qaeda to disburse. and they did. >> senator john kerry is expected to be confirmed next week as america's top diplomat, replacing the former senate colleague who introduced him. he will face multiple crisis across the middle east. >> every day that goes by in syria, it gets worse. every day that goes by it gets worse. >> so there is, it seems to me a very strong impetus that we realize that the present policy is not succeeding. and to look at other options to prevent what is going on for now 22 months. and 60,000 dead. >> republican senator marco rubio said the obama policy on syria has been so disorganized when the situation is resolved, the people there will hate the u.s. >> as iran's best friend. grand central station for terrorists all over the world it was in our national interest to help an opposition form organize itself. >> iran's nuclear program, kerry reiter
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova." >> our mind tries to put it in rms of robot or human? but the reality is a mix. >> brown: we close with politics and a look at the way forward for the republican party, beginning with today's house vote to extend the nation's debt limit for three months. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: secretary of state hillary clinton testified for the first time today about last september's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. her testimony befor
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
in africa, and the challenges for u.s foreign policy. the attack on the u.s. consulate we're joined by former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns who served in republican and democratic administrations, he's now with the kennedy school of government and harvard university. and danielle pletka, vice president for foreign and defense studies at the american enterprise institute. with you and start with benghazi. was there more light shed today. where do things stand in terms of understanding what happened and the response to it? >> well, jeffrey, i thought it was a commanding performance by secretary clinton. she was well informed. she was a master of the detail, and all the-- and she took responsibility, which was the right thing to do. she said that she will implement all the 29 recommendations of the accountability review board. now, i think the republicans there obviously had a right-- and i think they had an obligation to ask tough questions because this was a disaster for the american foreign service to lose four people in one day, including ambassador chris stevens. but i must say jus
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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